Drupal

Drupal Association collaborates on new, long-awaited tech initiative as featured on TagTeamTalk

Drupal.org - Thu, 10/03/2019 - 18:40

The Drupal Association collaborated on Automatic Updates, one of the Drupal Core Strategic Initiatives that was funded by the European Commission. We are excited to partner with MTech, Tag1 Consulting, and the European Commission FOSSA program on this new initiative and share information with you about its features.

Automatic Updates has three components.

Public safety messaging

This feature pulls a feed of alerts from Drupal.org directly into Drupal's administrative interface. This helps ensure that critical Public service announcements (PSA) or Security Advisories (SA) from the Drupal security team will be seen directly by site owners. 

  • This provides yet another communication mechanism before an update so site owners can verify they are ready for an upcoming update, before it lands.

  • The feed of alerts comes directly from the feed of PSAs and SAs that the security team and release managers are already producing. 

  • This will vastly increase the ability of the Drupal project to get the word out about critical and highly critical updates - ensuring the community can respond fast. 

Readiness checks, or “Pre-flight” checks

These automated and extensible readiness checks are built into the Automatic Updates system to verify that a site doesn't have any blockers that would prevent it from being updated.

  • These checks are slated to run at least every 6 hours on a site via Drupal Cron and will inform site owners if they are ready to auto update their site.

  • Examples of the readiness checks include:

    • Is the site is running on a read-only file system?

    • Have any files included in the update been modified from what they should be? 

    • Does the site still need to run database updates, etc.? 

There’s about 8 or 9 of these readiness checks and some are warnings (Cron isn’t running frequently enough to automatically update the site in a timely manner) and some are errors (the file system is read-only). Warnings won’t stop automatic updates, but errors will.

In place updates

Finally, the key pillar of the automatic updates feature is the update itself. Drupal.org generates a signed and secure package of files which can be overlaid atop the existing site files in order to apply the update. 

  • This update package is downloaded as a signed zip file from Drupal.org. The automatic updates module on the site then compares the signature of the zip file using drupal/php-signify, which is based on BSD’s Signify and libsodium to verify the package.

  • It then proceeds to backup the files about to be updated and updates the site.

  • If all goes well, the site is upgraded. If something fails, the backup is restored.

  • Many workflows are supported and you can customize how the updates are performed. Updates can flow through your CI/CD system, be staged for review and approval, and or automatically go live.

In the past few weeks, the Drupal Association has been invited to participate in TagTeamTalks, a new recorded talk series about various tech projects supporting the Drupal project. This bi-weekly format provides real-time shared collaboration and informative discussions. 

TagTeamTalk launched its webinar focused on Automatic Updates this week. The group dives deep into the nuts and bolts of Drupal's groundbreaking Automatic Updates feature, and the strategic initiative sponsored by the Drupal Association, MTech, Tag1 Consulting, and the European Commission. Guests include Preston So (prestonso), Contributing Editor at Tag1 and Moderator of the TagTeamTalks; Michael Meyers (michalemeyers), Managing Director of Tag1; Lucas Hedding (heddn), Senior Architect and Data and Application Migration Expert at Tag1; Fabian Franz (Fabianx), Senior Technical Architect and Performance Lead at Tag1; and Tim Lehnen (hestenet) CTO at the Drupal Association. Read the TagTeamTalks blog.

Content marketing is one of the most effective ways to promote your brand and capabilities - it has been a really powerful approach for the organizations that I’ve worked for,” said Michael. “The goal is to give our team an opportunity to talk about the cool things they’re working on and excited about and to share it with people. It helps get the word out about the latest developments in the open source communities we contribute to, and it promotes Tag1’s expertise - it helps us recruit new hires, and drives new business.” 

Meyers is the Managing Director of Tag1, and has been involved with the Drupal community for over 15 years. He was Founder and CTO of the first venture backed drupal based startup, CTO of the first Top 100 website on Drupal, and VP of Developer Relations at Acquia before joining Tag1.  “The great thing about TagTeamTalks is that it doesn’t take a tremendous amount of effort or energy. Our engineers are subject matter experts. We decide on a topic for the week, spend 15 minutes brainstorming a rough outline as a guide, and then record the talk. We don’t want to be rehearsed. The conversation is what makes it dynamic and enjoyable for us to do, and for people to listen to. And, the team loves it because they want to talk about what they are working on, and this format doesn’t take a lot of time away from what they enjoy doing most - writing code.” 

Hedding is one of the top 20 most active contributors to Drupal 8, and is also the Drupal Core Migrate Sub-system Maintainer, a core contribution mentor, and a D.O. project application reviewer. “Auto Updates has long been one of the most requested Drupal features, it is a capability the platform really needs that will help everyone using Drupal. Now that the alpha is available, we need to early adopters to start using it, we need feedback so we can continue to improve it. We also need to get more people involved in development, and we need to raise more money from organizations to support the project - it might sound like a simple feature, but it is actually really complex and requires a lot of effort. TagTeamTalks are a great way to get the word out and to enlist support from the Drupal community.”

Lucas added, “The European Commission provided generous funding for this initiative. The focus has been exclusively or largely around the European Commission’s features and functionality. The funding is running out very soon. There is a need for other people to help continue to build Automatic Updates by adding the features they need with their developers or by providing funding.”  

“It is critical for us to spread the message and make that call to action; that this is a community-driven effort and that without continued community support, it is not going to be as successful or as robust in the timeframe that we would like,” said Meyers.

The first year of funding from the European Commission provided for readiness checking, delivery of update 'quasi-patches,’ and a robust package signing system. The focus of this first phase of the Automatic Updates initiative has been on support for security updates in particular. 

In the second phase, as yet unfunded, we hope to extend this foundational work in the following ways:

  • Provide more robust composer support. The first phase of the automatic updates project should be compatible with composer-ready sites, but as the site’s composer.json file and vendor directory of a site change from the default, then more controls and though need to be implemented. 

  • Create an A/B front-end controller for the site being updated to further increase our confidence in the success of the update, allow for additional post-update testing and provide an easy mechanism to roll-back the update. This is also when updates will be able to move into Drupal core from the contrib project.

  • Expand to more types of updates (particularly further support for contrib updates), and also handle multiple updates in a row, for sites that are several versions behind. 

To accomplish all of this, we will continue to seek more funding and more partners. 

“I’m looking forward to seeing where this goes now that we have the first release out, ” said Hedding. “ There’s a larger community needed to get this initiative completed.”

The initial alpha version of the Automatic Updates module can be tested by the community right now. The plan is to: demonstrate Automatic Updates at DrupalCon Amsterdam this month, complete the scope of the funded work by the European Commission by the end of this year, and stabilize Automatic Updates by DrupalCon Minneapolis in May 2020. 

“The Automatic Updates initiative is designed to reduce the friction in keeping a Drupal site secure and up-to-date. The team behind the initiative is architecting a robust system, secure by design, and building components that can be shared with the broader PHP community,” said Tim Lehnen.

Many thanks to MTech, Tag1 Consulting, and the European Commission FOSSA program for funding this initiative. The Drupal Association is proud to be a part of this initiative.

Categories: Drupal

#DigitalClimateStrike and Drupal.org - thinking of all our futures

Drupal.org - Thu, 09/19/2019 - 20:12

You will notice that, along with thousands of websites around the world, Drupal.org posted a banner message this week declaring we are opting in to a global Digital Climate Strike on 20th September.

Will @drupal website add the #DigitalClimateStrike banner? @baluertl requested it and mocked up a visual... https://t.co/XcIj9Gf173 pic.twitter.com/Zl0ctyc7G6

— ClimateAction.tech (@climateActTech) September 18, 2019

Of course, because Drupal.org is an essential service to over a million websites around the world, we have to be sure that we still allow them all to continue to access resources here. As such, the full page banner that will appear on websites on the 20th September will be configured to allow visitors to cancel it, should they need to.

Fundamentally, the Drupal Association wants to be a good steward of the environment and recognizes the impact that technology has on environmental issues. We are committed to exploring ways for the Drupal project to reduce its carbon footprint and to become a more eco-friendly platform. Today, we stand with others in the technology industry to educate and inform the general public about some of the ways that the tech industry can support environmental causes.

If the environmental sustainability of Drupal websites is a subject as close to your hearts as it is to ours, you might like to know that recently a #sustainable Slack channel was created for discussion on the topic.

Categories: Drupal

My first event: DrupalCamp Atlanta

Drupal.org - Wed, 09/18/2019 - 19:17

Many thanks to Kaleem Clarkson (kclarkson) and his team for organizing a great DrupalCamp Atlanta. I had a time of learning, connecting and being inspired!

I started my day at DrupalCamp Atlanta by participating in the workshop “Introduction to Drupal,” led by longtime Drupal community member Doug Vann (dougvann). Joining me was Rudy Dodier, from Platform.sh. Doug covered everything from the history of Drupal, to setting up a basic website to how the word “system” in Content Management System can be an acronym for: Saves You Some Time Energy Money.

I took copious notes, as I continue to connect the dots to the power of the Drupal project - to how it is leading a digital transformation across industries. I absorbed it all, and was eager to learn more. I met other developers and individuals who contribute so much to the Drupal project and to the Drupal community. From my conversations with Ray Saltini (rgs) and Mike Anello (ultimike) to Suzanne Dergacheva (pixelite), I was struck by the level of commitment demonstrated by the community. You'll get a sense for this in Suzanne's slides for her Growing the Drupal Community talk.

Heather Rocker (hrocker) also attended and presented at the Career Fair. She spoke about the importance of the Association’s initiative on Diversity, Equity & Inclusion and the benefits that come from actively recruiting and welcoming new individuals (especially those from underrepresented communities) to lend their skills to the project.

I realize the extensive number of stories that are within this vast and passionate community, and I am excited to promote and talk about them. I am looking forward to being a communications and marketing advocate for the Drupal community, the Drupal project and the Drupal Association. From the specific needs of developers, to the importance of broadening our audience, to the necessity of career fairs to bring students on the Drupal train, and to the need for marketing to grow Drupal adoption, I heard and learned so much in a short visit to Atlanta. But, what impressed me as much as the day was the contagious enthusiasm for what the community is doing and for what it can accomplish!


The DrupalCamp Atlanta Leadership Team, without whom the event wouldn't have been possible!

Thanks to everyone who came out for #DCATL this year! We loved meeting y'all. Let's continue to grow and support the @drupal community! pic.twitter.com/q9IgHjVRkA

— DrupalCamp Atlanta (@DrupalCamp_ATL) September 14, 2019

Categories: Drupal

Who sponsors Drupal development? (2018-2019 edition)

Drupal.org - Fri, 09/13/2019 - 00:24

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog.

An in-depth analysis of how Drupal's development was sponsored between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019.

The past years, I've examined Drupal.org's contribution data to understand who develops Drupal, how diverse the Drupal community is, how much of Drupal's maintenance and innovation is sponsored, and where that sponsorship comes from.

You can look at the 2016 report, the 2017 report, and the 2018 report. Each report looks at data collected in the 12-month period between July 1st and June 30th.

This year's report shows that:

  • Both the recorded number of contributors and contributions have increased.
  • Most contributions are sponsored, but volunteer contributions remains very important to Drupal's success.
  • Drupal's maintenance and innovation depends mostly on smaller Drupal agencies and Acquia. Hosting companies, multi-platform digital marketing agencies, large system integrators and end users make fewer contributions to Drupal.
  • Drupal's contributors have become more diverse, but are still not diverse enough.
Methodology What are Drupal.org issues?

"Issues" are pages on Drupal.org. Each issue tracks an idea, feature request, bug report, task, or more. See https://www.drupal.org/project/issues for the list of all issues.

For this report, we looked at all Drupal.org issues marked "closed" or "fixed" in the 12-month period from July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019. The issues analyzed in this report span Drupal core and thousands of contributed projects, across all major versions of Drupal.

What are Drupal.org credits?

In the spring of 2015, after proposing initial ideas for giving credit, Drupal.org added the ability for people to attribute their work in the Drupal.org issues to an organization or customer, or mark it the result of volunteer efforts.

A screenshot of an issue comment on Drupal.org. You can see that jamadar worked on this patch as a volunteer, but also as part of his day job working for TATA Consultancy Services on behalf of their customer, Pfizer.

Drupal.org's credit system is truly unique and groundbreaking in Open Source and provides unprecedented insights into the inner workings of a large Open Source project. There are a few limitations with this approach, which we'll address at the end of this report.

What is the Drupal community working on?

In the 12-month period between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019, 27,522 issues were marked "closed" or "fixed", a 13% increase from the 24,447 issues in the 2017-2018 period.

In total, the Drupal community worked on 3,474 different Drupal.org projects this year compared to 3,229 projects in the 2017-2018 period — an 8% year over year increase.

The majority of the credits are the result of work on contributed modules:

Compared to the previous period, contribution credits increased across all project types:

The most notable change is the large jump in "non-product credits": more and more members in the community started tracking credits for non-product activities such as organizing Drupal events (e.g. DrupalCamp Delhi projectDrupal Developer DaysDrupal Europe and DrupalCon Europe), promoting Drupal (e.g. Drupal pitch deck or community working groups (e.g. Drupal Diversity and Inclusion Working GroupGovernance Working Group).

While some of these increases reflect new contributions, others are existing contributions that are newly reported. All contributions are valuable, whether they're code contributions, or non-product and community-oriented contributions such as organizing events, giving talks, leading sprints, etc. The fact that the credit system is becoming more accurate in recognizing more types of Open Source contribution is both important and positive.

Who is working on Drupal?

For this report's time period, Drupal.org's credit system received contributions from 8,513 different individuals and 1,137 different organizations — a meaningful increase from last year's report.

Consistent with previous years, approximately 51% of the individual contributors received just one credit. Meanwhile, the top 30 contributors (the top 0.4%) account for 19% of the total credits. In other words, a relatively small number of individuals do the majority of the work. These individuals put an incredible amount of time and effort into developing Drupal and its contributed projects:

Rank Username Issues 1 kiamlaluno 1610 2 jrockowitz 756 3 alexpott 642 4 RajabNatshah 616 5 volkswagenchick 519 6 bojanz 504 7 alonaoneill 489 8 thalles 488 9 Wim Leers 437 10 DamienMcKenna 431 11 Berdir 424 12 chipway 356 13 larowlan 324 14 pifagor 320 15 catch 313 16 mglaman 277 17 adci_contributor 274 18 quietone 266 19 tim.plunkett 265 20 gaurav.kapoor 253 21 RenatoG 246 22 heddn 243 23 chr.fritsch 241 24 xjm 238 25 phenaproxima 238 26 mkalkbrenner 235 27 gvso 232 28 dawehner 219 29 e0ipso 218 30 drumm 205

Out of the top 30 contributors featured this year, 28 were active contributors in the 2017-2018 period as well. These Drupalists' dedication and continued contribution to the project has been crucial to Drupal's development.

It's also important to recognize that most of the top 30 contributors are sponsored by an organization. Their sponsorship details are provided later in this article. We value the organizations that sponsor these remarkable individuals, because without their support, it could be more challenging for these individuals to be in the top 30.

It's also nice to see two new contributors make the top 30 this year — Alona O'neill with sponsorship from Hook 42 and Thalles Ferreira with sponsorship from CI&T. Most of their credits were the result of smaller patches (e.g. removing deprecated code, fixing coding style issues, etc) or in some cases non-product credits rather than new feature development or fixing complex bugs. These types of contributions are valuable and often a stepping stone towards towards more in-depth contribution.

How much of the work is sponsored?

Issue credits can be marked as "volunteer" and "sponsored" simultaneously (shown in jamadar's screenshot near the top of this post). This could be the case when a contributor does the necessary work to satisfy the customer's need, in addition to using their spare time to add extra functionality.

For those credits with attribution details, 18% were "purely volunteer" credits (8,433 credits), in stark contrast to the 65% that were "purely sponsored" (29,802 credits). While there are almost four times as many "purely sponsored" credits as "purely volunteer" credits, volunteer contribution remains very important to Drupal.

Both "purely volunteer" and "purely sponsored" credits grew — "purely sponsored" credits grew faster in absolute numbers, but for the first time in four years "purely volunteer" credits grew faster in relative numbers.

The large jump in volunteer credits can be explained by the community capturing more non-product contributions. As can be seen on the graph below, these non-product contributions are more volunteer-centric.

Who is sponsoring the work?

Now that we've established that the majority of contributions to Drupal are sponsored, let's study which organizations contribute to Drupal. While 1,137 different organizations contributed to Drupal, approximately 50% of them received four credits or less. The top 30 organizations (roughly the top 3%) account for approximately 25% of the total credits, which implies that the top 30 companies play a crucial role in the health of the Drupal project.

Top contributing organizations based on the number of issue credits.

While not immediately obvious from the graph above, a variety of different types of companies are active in Drupal's ecosystem:

Category Description Traditional Drupal businesses Small-to-medium-sized professional services companies that primarily make money using Drupal. They typically employ fewer than 100 employees, and because they specialize in Drupal, many of these professional services companies contribute frequently and are a huge part of our community. Examples are Hook42, Centarro, The Big Blue House, Vardot, etc. Digital marketing agencies Larger full-service agencies that have marketing-led practices using a variety of tools, typically including Drupal, Adobe Experience Manager, Sitecore, WordPress, etc. They tend to be larger, with many of the larger agencies employing thousands of people. Examples are Wunderman, Possible and Mirum. System integrators Larger companies that specialize in bringing together different technologies into one solution. Example system agencies are Accenture, TATA Consultancy Services, Capgemini and CI&T. Hosting companies Examples are Acquia, Rackspace, Pantheon and Platform.sh. End users Examples are Pfizer or bio.logis Genetic Information Management GmbH.

A few observations:

  • Almost all of the sponsors in the top 30 are traditional Drupal businesses with fewer than 50 employees. Only five companies in the top 30 — Pfizer, Google, CI&T, bio.logis and Acquia — are not traditional Drupal businesses. The traditional Drupal businesses are responsible for almost 80% of all the credits in the top 30. This percentage goes up if you extend beyond the top 30. It's fair to say that Drupal's maintenance and innovation largely depends on these traditional Drupal businesses.
  • The larger, multi-platform digital marketing agencies are barely contributing to Drupal. While more and more large digital agencies are building out Drupal practices, no digital marketing agencies show up in the top 30, and hardly any appear in the entire list of contributing organizations. While they are not required to contribute, I'm frustrated that we have not yet found the right way to communicate the value of contribution to these companies. We need to incentivize each of these firms to contribute back with the same commitment that we see from traditional Drupal businesses
  • The only system integrator in the top 30 is CI&T, which ranked 4th with 795 credits. As far as system integrators are concerned, CI&T is a smaller player with approximately 2,500 employees. However, we do see various system integrators outside of the top 30, including Globant, Capgemini, Sapient and TATA Consultancy Services. In the past year, Capgemini almost quadrupled their credits from 46 to 196, TATA doubled its credits from 85 to 194, Sapient doubled its credits from 28 to 65, and Globant kept more or less steady with 41 credits. Accenture and Wipro do not appear to contribute despite doing a fair amount of Drupal work in the field.
  • Hosting companies also play an important role in our community, yet only Acquia appears in the top 30. Rackspace has 68 credits, Pantheon has 43, and Platform.sh has 23. I looked for other hosting companies in the data, but couldn't find any. In general, there is a persistent problem with hosting companies that make a lot of money with Drupal not contributing back. The contribution gap between Acquia and other hosting companies has increased, not decreased.
  • We also saw three end users in the top 30 as corporate sponsors: Pfizer (453 credits), Thunder (659 credits, up from 432 credits the year before), and the German company, bio.logis (330 credits). A notable end user is Johnson & Johnson, who was just outside of the top 30, with 221 credits, up from 29 credits the year before. Other end users outside of the top 30, include the European Commission (189 credits), Workday (112 credits), Paypal (80 credits), NBCUniversal (48 credits), Wolters Kluwer (20 credits), and Burda Media (24 credits). We also saw contributions from many universities, including the University of British Columbia (148 credits), University of Waterloo (129 credits), Princeton University (73 credits), University of Austin Texas at Austin (57 credits), Charles Darwin University (24 credits), University of Edinburgh (23 credits), University of Minnesota (19 credits) and many more.

It would be interesting to see what would happen if more end users mandated contributions from their partners. Pfizer, for example, only works with agencies that contribute back to Drupal, and uses Drupal's credit system to verify their vendors' claims. The State of Georgia started doing the same; they also made Open Source contribution a vendor selection criteria. If more end users took this stance, it could have a big impact on the number of digital agencies, hosting companies and system integrators that contribute to Drupal.

While we should encourage more organizations to sponsor Drupal contributions, we should also understand and respect that some organizations can give more than others and that some might not be able to give back at all. Our goal is not to foster an environment that demands what and how others should give back. Instead, we need to help foster an environment worthy of contribution. This is clearly laid out in Drupal's Values and Principles.

How diverse is Drupal?

Supporting diversity and inclusion within Drupal is essential to the health and success of the project. The people who work on Drupal should reflect the diversity of people who use and work with the web.

I looked at both the gender and geographic diversity of Drupal.org contributors. While these are only two examples of diversity, these are the only diversity characteristics we currently have sufficient data for. Drupal.org recently rolled out support for Big 8/Big 10, so next year we should have more demographics information

Gender diversity

The data shows that only 8% of the recorded contributions were made by contributors who do not identify as male, which continues to indicate a wide gender gap. This is a one percent increase compared to last year. The gender imbalance in Drupal is profound and underscores the need to continue fostering diversity and inclusion in our community.

Last year I wrote a post called about the privilege of free time in Open Source. It made the case that Open Source is not a meritocracy, because not everyone has equal amounts of free time to contribute. For example, research shows that women still spend more than double the time as men doing unpaid domestic work, such as housework or childcare. This makes it more difficult for women to contribute to Open Source on an unpaid, volunteer basis. It's one of the reasons why Open Source projects suffer from a lack of diversity, among others including hostile environments and unconscious biases. Drupal.org's credit data unfortunately still shows a big gender disparity in contributions:

Ideally, over time, we can collect more data on non-binary gender designations, as well as segment some of the trends behind contributions by gender. We can also do better at collecting data on other systemic issues beyond gender alone. Knowing more about these trends can help us close existing gaps. In the meantime, organizations capable of giving back should consider financially sponsoring individuals from underrepresented groups to contribute to Open Source. Each of us needs to decide if and how we can help give time and opportunities to underrepresented groups and how we can create equity for everyone in Drupal.

Geographic diversity

When measuring geographic diversity, we saw individual contributors from six continents and 114 countries:

Contribution credits per capita calculated as the amount of contributions per continent divided by the population of each continent. 0.001% means that one in 100,000 people contribute to Drupal. In North America, 5 in 100,000 people contributed to Drupal the last year.

Contributions from Europe and North America are both on the rise. In absolute terms, Europe contributes more than North America, but North America contributes more per capita.

Asia, South America and Africa remain big opportunities for Drupal, as their combined population accounts for 6.3 billion out of 7.5 billion people in the world. Unfortunately, the reported contributions from Asia are declining year over year. For example, compared to last year's report, there was a 17% drop in contribution from India. Despite that drop, India remains the second largest contributor behind the United States:

The top 20 countries from which contributions originate. The data is compiled by aggregating the countries of all individual contributors behind each issue. Note that the geographical location of contributors doesn't always correspond with the origin of their sponsorship. Wim Leers, for example, works from Belgium, but his funding comes from Acquia, which has the majority of its customers in North America.

Top contributor details

To create more awareness of which organizations are sponsoring the top individual contributors, I included a more detailed overview of the top 50 contributors and their sponsors. If you are a Drupal developer looking for work, these are some of the companies I'd apply to first. If you are an end user looking for a company to work with, these are some of the companies I'd consider working with first. Not only do they know Drupal well, they also help improve your investment in Drupal.

Rank Username Issues Volunteer Sponsored Not specified Sponsors 1 kiamlaluno 1610 99% 0% 1% 2 jrockowitz 756 98% 99% 0% The Big Blue House (750), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (5), Rosewood Marketing (1) 3 alexpott 642 6% 80% 19% Thunder (336), Acro Media Inc (100), Chapter Three (77) 4 RajabNatshah 616 1% 100% 0% Vardot (730), Webship (2) 5 volkswagenchick 519 2% 99% 0% Hook 42 (341), Kanopi Studios (171) 6 bojanz 504 0% 98% 2% Centarro (492), Ny Media AS (28), Torchbox (5), Liip (2), Adapt (2) 7 alonaoneill 489 9% 99% 0% Hook 42 (484) 8 thalles 488 0% 100% 0% CI&T (488), Janrain (3), Johnson & Johnson (2) 9 Wim Leers 437 8% 97% 0% Acquia (421), Government of Flanders (3) 10 DamienMcKenna 431 0% 97% 3% Mediacurrent (420) 11 Berdir 424 0% 92% 8% MD Systems (390) 12 chipway 356 0% 100% 0% Chipway (356) 13 larowlan 324 16% 94% 2% PreviousNext (304), Charles Darwin University (22), University of Technology, Sydney (3), Service NSW (2), Department of Justice & Regulation, Victoria (1) 14 pifagor 320 52% 100% 0% GOLEMS GABB (618), EPAM Systems (16), Drupal Ukraine Community (6) 15 catch 313 1% 95% 4% Third & Grove (286), Tag1 Consulting (11), Drupal Association (6), Acquia (4) 16 mglaman 277 2% 98% 1% Centarro (271), Oomph, Inc. (16), E.C. Barton & Co (3), Gaggle.net, Inc. (1), Bluespark (1), Thinkbean (1), LivePerson, Inc (1), Impactiv, Inc. (1), Rosewood Marketing (1), Acro Media Inc (1) 17 adci_contributor 274 0% 100% 0% ADCI Solutions (273) 18 quietone 266 41% 75% 1% Acro Media Inc (200) 19 tim.plunkett 265 3% 89% 9% Acquia (235) 20 gaurav.kapoor 253 0% 51% 49% OpenSense Labs (129), DrupalFit (111) 21 RenatoG 246 0% 100% 0% CI&T (246), Johnson & Johnson (85) 22 heddn 243 2% 98% 2% MTech, LLC (202), Tag1 Consulting (32), European Commission (22), North Studio (3), Acro Media Inc (2) 23 chr.fritsch 241 0% 99% 1% Thunder (239) 24 xjm 238 0% 85% 15% Acquia (202) 25 phenaproxima 238 0% 100% 0% Acquia (238) 26 mkalkbrenner 235 0% 100% 0% bio.logis Genetic Information Management GmbH (234), OSCE: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (41), Welsh Government (4) 27 gvso 232 0% 100% 0% Google Summer of Code (214), Google Code-In (16), Zivtech (1) 28 dawehner 219 39% 84% 8% Chapter Three (176), Drupal Association (5), Tag1 Consulting (3), TES Global (1) 29 e0ipso 218 99% 100% 0% Lullabot (217), IBM (23) 30 drumm 205 0% 98% 1% Drupal Association (201) 31 gabesullice 199 0% 100% 0% Acquia (198), Aten Design Group (1) 32 amateescu 194 0% 97% 3% Pfizer, Inc. (186), Drupal Association (1), Chapter Three (1) 33 klausi 193 2% 59% 40% jobiqo - job board technology (113) 34 samuel.mortenson 187 42% 42% 17% Acquia (79) 35 joelpittet 187 28% 78% 14% The University of British Columbia (146) 36 borisson_ 185 83% 50% 3% Calibrate (79), Dazzle (13), Intracto digital agency (1) 37 Gábor Hojtsy 184 0% 97% 3% Acquia (178) 38 adriancid 182 91% 22% 2% Drupiter (40) 39 eiriksm 182 0% 100% 0% Violinist (178), Ny Media AS (4) 40 yas 179 12% 80% 10% DOCOMO Innovations, Inc. (143) 41 TR 177 0% 0% 100% 42 hass 173 1% 0% 99% 43 Joachim Namyslo 172 69% 0% 31% 44 alex_optim 171 0% 99% 1% GOLEMS GABB (338) 45 flocondetoile 168 0% 99% 1% Flocon de toile (167) 46 Lendude 168 52% 99% 0% Dx Experts (91), ezCompany (67), Noctilaris (9) 47 paulvandenburg 167 11% 72% 21% ezCompany (120) 48 voleger 165 98% 98% 2% GOLEMS GABB (286), Lemberg Solutions Limited (36), Drupal Ukraine Community (1) 49 lauriii 164 3% 98% 1% Acquia (153), Druid (8), Lääkärikeskus Aava Oy (2) 50 idebr 162 0% 99% 1% ezCompany (156), One Shoe (5) Limitations of the credit system

It is important to note a few of the current limitations of Drupal.org's credit system:

  • The credit system doesn't capture all code contributions. Parts of Drupal are developed on GitHub rather than Drupal.org, and often aren't fully credited on Drupal.org. For example, Drush is maintained on GitHub instead of Drupal.org, and companies like Pantheon don't get credit for that work. The Drupal Association is working to integrate GitLab with Drupal.org. GitLab will provide support for "merge requests", which means contributing to Drupal will feel more familiar to the broader audience of Open Source contributors who learned their skills in the post-patch era. Some of GitLab's tools, such as in-line editing and web-based code review will also lower the barrier to contribution, and should help us grow both the number of contributions and contributors on Drupal.org.
  • The credit system is not used by everyone. There are many ways to contribute to Drupal that are still not captured in the credit system, including things like event organizing or providing support. Technically, that work could be captured as demonstrated by the various non-product initiatives highlighted in this post. Because using the credit system is optional, many contributors don't. As a result, contributions often have incomplete or no contribution credits. We need to encourage all Drupal contributors to use the credit system, and raise awareness of its benefits to both individuals and organizations. Where possible, we should automatically capture credits. For example, translation efforts on https://localize.drupal.org are not currently captured in the credit system but could be automatically.
  • The credit system disincentives work on complex issues. We currently don't have a way to account for the complexity and quality of contributions; one person might have worked several weeks for just one credit, while another person might receive a credit for 10 minutes of work. We certainly see a few individuals and organizations trying to game the credit system. In the future, we should consider issuing credit data in conjunction with issue priority, patch size, number of reviews, etc. This could help incentivize people to work on larger and more important problems and save smaller issues such as coding standards improvements for new contributor sprints. Implementing a scoring system that ranks the complexity of an issue would also allow us to develop more accurate reports of contributed work.

All of this means that the actual number of contributions and contributors could be significantly higher than what we report.

Like Drupal itself, the Drupal.org credit system needs to continue to evolve. Ultimately, the credit system will only be useful when the community uses it, understands its shortcomings, and suggests constructive improvements.

A first experiment with weighing credits

As a simple experiment, I decided to weigh each credit based on the adoption of the project the credit is attributed to. For example, each contribution credit to Drupal core is given a weight of 11 because Drupal core has about 1,1 million active installations. Credits to the Webform module, which has over 400,000 installations, get a weight of 4. And credits to Drupal's Commerce project gets just 1 point as it is installed on fewer than 100,000 sites.

The idea is that these weights capture the end user impact of each contribution, but also act as a proxy for the effort required to get a change committed. Getting a change accepted in Drupal core is both more difficult and more impactful than getting a change accepted to Commerce project.

This weighting is far from perfect as it undervalues non-product contributions, and it still doesn't recognize all types of product contributions (e.g. product strategy work, product management work, release management work, etc). That said, for code contributions, it may be more accurate than a purely unweighted approach.

The top 30 contributing individuals based on weighted Drupal.org issue credits.

The top 30 contributing organizations based on weighted Drupal.org issue credits.

Conclusions

Our data confirms that Drupal is a vibrant community full of contributors who are constantly evolving and improving the software. It's amazing to see that just in the last year, Drupal welcomed more than 8,000 individuals contributors and over 1,100 corporate contributors. It's especially nice to see the number of reported contributions, individual contributors and organizational contributors increase year over year.

To grow and sustain Drupal, we should support those that contribute to Drupal and find ways to get those that are not contributing involved in our community. Improving diversity within Drupal is critical, and we should welcome any suggestions that encourage participation from a broader range of individuals and organizations.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association Announces Newly Appointed Board Members

Drupal.org - Wed, 09/11/2019 - 18:49

Portland, OR - The Drupal Association, an international nonprofit organization, welcomes its newly appointed board members to help advance its mission to unite a global open source community to build, secure, and promote Drupal. The Association’s Board of Directors ratified the appointment of five new board members in September, including: Grace Francisco, Lo Li, Owen Lansbury, Ryan Szrama and Leslie Glynn, who was elected for the community-at-large seat.

“We are excited to have these amazing individuals join us in our efforts to broaden our reach into diverse communities and to grow Drupal adoption. They bring a wide range of experiences and expertise to the Association that will enhance our opportunities to reach new audiences, support the Drupal community and elevate the Drupal project around the world,” said Adam Goodman, Drupal Association Board Chair. “We welcome Grace’s significant work in developer relations, developer marketing and program management; Leslie’s experience as a developer and project manager long emphasized by her years of contributions as a Drupal community member; Owen’s creative problem-solving, local Drupal association and DrupalCamp experience and business leadership skills; Lo’s extensive work in content management, brand promotion and tech platforms alongside her advocacy for women in technology; and Ryan’s product and service development and business skills coupled with his strong relationships in the Drupal community. We look forward to working with all of our new board members to achieve the Association’s strategic goals.”

Grace Francisco joined MongoDB in July as Vice President, Worldwide Developer Relations. Prior to that, she served as Vice President of Developer Relations and Education at gaming platform Roblox where she doubled the size of active developers to 2+ million. A seasoned developer relations leader with over 20 years of experience in software, she has co-authored three patents and led worldwide developer initiatives at Microsoft, Intuit, Yodlee and Atlassian. Francisco graduated cum laude and holds a BBA in Business Management from Golden Gate University.

“I am super excited to join the Drupal Association board,” said Francisco. “I first encountered the Drupal project back in 2010 while I was at Microsoft doing outreach to open source projects - building bridges to open source communities. It’s wonderful now, almost a decade later, to help from the other side to build bridges from Drupal to other tech organizations to broaden Drupal’s adoption.”

Leslie Glynn has more than thirty years of experience in the tech field as a software developer and project manager. She has been a freelance Drupal Project Manager and Site Builder since 2012. Glynn is very active in the Drupal community as an event organizer (Design 4 Drupal, Boston and NEDCamp), sprint organizer, mentor, trainer and volunteer. She is the winner of the 2019 Aaron Winborn Award. This annual award recognizes an individual who demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal community.

“Being a volunteer at numerous Drupal camps and DrupalCons has given me the opportunity to meet and learn from many diverse members of the Drupal community,” said Glynn. “I hope to bring that knowledge and experience to my work on Drupal Association initiatives. One of the things I would like to help with is growing Drupal adoption through new initiatives that reach out to underrepresented and diverse groups through an increased presence at secondary schools and universities and to groups, such as Girls Who Code, in the tech space.”

Owen Lansbury is co-founder of PreviousNext, an independent Australian digital design and development company that has been one of the world's most prolific code contributors to the Drupal project. With 25 years’ professional experience and a background in Fine Art, Digital Media and User Experience Design, Lansbury blends creative problem solving with the business skills required to sustain his own company and work successfully with complex customers. He is also an active leader within the Australian and New Zealand Drupal community, bringing DrupalCon to Sydney in 2013, acting as Track Chair at several regional events and chairing the DrupalSouth Steering Committee.

Lansbury said, “As a long-term Drupal community contributor in Australia and New Zealand, I'm excited about the opportunity to bring my grassroots experience to the Association board at a global level. I've always been a bit jealous of our developers contributing code to Drupal, so being able to contribute my own business and community leadership experience to the Association board is a great opportunity for me to give something back at a global level."

Lo Li is the Senior Vice President, CIO of Global Consumer Solutions at Equifax. She has spent the past two decades leading global multi-billion dollar corporations for some of the world’s most renowned hospitality and retail brands in the world, working with hundreds of teams dispersed in the UK, China, Singapore and India. Some of her work includes the creation for dynamic pricing and predictive analytics engines for global hotels; and scaling big data and Agile to enable business transformation at large retailers including double digit growth plans for digital and international presence. She brings a deep understanding of how to translate corporate visions and strategies into simple, elegant solutions - using her international business acumen and technology background as both a business enabler and a competitive differentiator. Li, who is multilingual - fluent in Mandarin, Portuguese, Spanish and English - is the recipient of several industry accolades and serves on the Board of Directors for several national nonprofit organizations. She received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degree from the University of Georgia.

Li said, “I am thrilled to join the Drupal Association board because of the incredible open source community that has been fostered. The nurturing and growth of communities, like the one we have at Drupal, are the very catalyst to help organizations leap forward and provide an incubator for new ideas and thought leadership amongst digital citizens. It's truly an honor to be able to help shape the future of such a great organization!”

Ryan Szrama co-founded Commerce Guys in 2009 to offer Drupal-based eCommerce consulting and development services. He was the project lead of Drupal’s most popular eCommerce framework, Drupal Commerce, from its creation to its eventual use on over 60,000 websites. In 2016, Ryan acquired control of Commerce Guys from his partners, leading the company to rebrand to Centarro and launch new product and support offerings that enable teams to build with confidence on Drupal Commerce.

"My personal goals align perfectly with the mission of the Drupal Association: uniting a global open source community to build Drupal,” said Szrama. “I've been privileged to build a career in this community as a long-time contributor turned business owner, and I'm continually inspired by the members of this board to think bigger and give back more. I hope to apply my knowledge and experience to board initiatives that empower more people to better themselves and their organizations by using and contributing to Drupal."

The newly-elected members will join the following Association board members, continuing their service in the upcoming term: 

  • Baddý Sonja Breidert, 1xINTERNET

  • Dries Buytaert, Acquia

  • Luma Dahlbacka, Charles Schwab & Co

  • Suzanne Dergacheva, Evolving Web

  • Adam Goodman, Northwestern University’s Center for Leadership

  • Mike Lamb, Pfizer

  • Audra Martin-Merrick, Red Backpack Limited

  • George Matthes, Johnson & Johnson

  • Vishal Mehrotra, Tata Consultancy Services

  • Ingo Rübet, BOTLabs GmbH

  • Michel van Velde, One Shoe

About Drupal

Drupal is one of the leading content management software platforms that has been used to create millions of websites around the world. There are 46,000 plus developers with 1.3 million users on Drupal.org, and Drupal has the largest open source community in the world. Drupal has great standard features, easy content authoring, reliable performance and excellent security. What sets it apart is its flexibility; modularity is one of its core principles. Its tools help you build the versatile, structured content that ambitious web experiences need.

About Drupal Association

The Drupal Association is an international non-profit organization that engages a broad audience about Drupal, the leading CMS open source project. The Association promotes  Drupal adoption through the work and initiatives of a worldwide community of dedicated contributors, and support from individual and organizational members. The Drupal Association helps the Drupal community with funding, infrastructure, education, promotion, distribution and online collaboration. For more information, visit Drupal.org.

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Categories: Drupal

WYSIWYG media embedding in Drupal 8.8

Drupal.org - Tue, 09/10/2019 - 23:34

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog.

I'm excited to share that when Drupal 8.8 drops in December, Drupal's WYSIWYG editor will allow media embedding.

You may wonder: Why is that worth announcing on your blog? It's just one new button in my WYSIWYG editor.

It's a big deal because Drupal's media management has been going through a decade-long transformation. The addition of WYSIWYG integration completes the final milestone. You can read more about it on Wim's blog post.

Drupal 8.8 should ship with complete media management, which is fantastic news for site builders and content authors who have long wanted a simpler way to embed media in Drupal.

Congratulations to the Media Initiative team for this significant achievement!

Categories: Drupal

Welcome Carole Bernard to the Drupal Association

Drupal.org - Tue, 08/27/2019 - 20:50

The Drupal Association (DA) is pleased to announce the recent hire of Carole Bernard as the Director of Marketing and Outreach. She and her team will focus on increasing visibility for the Drupal Association and opportunities for Drupal adoption through marketing, community engagement, volunteer management and public relations activities.

With extensive nonprofit and public sector experience, Bernard has served in senior leadership roles for more than 15 years at local, regional and national organizations.  

Bernard, a Boston native, began her career as a speechwriter for the Mayor of Boston. She then worked as the Director of Public Information for the largest human service agency in New England, Action for Boston Community Development, Inc. She started her own consulting business in 2015, providing strategic communications, fundraising and executive management services to nonprofit organizations in the Washington, DC area. She recently served as the Director of Communications and Marketing for Sickle Cell Disease Association of America, Inc. She also has worked for Paralyzed Veterans of America, National Center for Women and Children and the National Minority AIDS Council as their Director of Communication.

“I am so excited to be a part of the dynamic team at the Drupal Association,” says Bernard. “I am blown away by the passion and commitment of the Drupal community, and I look forward to working with everyone to tell the DA story, to showcase the Drupal project, to broaden the organization’s reach to new audiences and to increase opportunities for Drupal adoption around the world through strategic communications and outreach efforts.”

“We want to continue to position Drupal as the leading open-source CMS for ambitious digital experiences that reach audiences across multiple channels around the world,” says Heather Rocker, DA Executive Director. “We also want to expand our efforts to bring new entities and individuals to the table to participate in our global community. We are excited to have Carole join us and to help us lay out and execute a plan that leverages all of the DA assets for growth, inclusion, awareness and participation.”

Bernard received her bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Framingham State College and her master’s degree in Journalism from Boston University.

Categories: Drupal

Bringing Federated Search to the State of Georgia

Drupal.org - Tue, 08/06/2019 - 01:10
Completed Drupal site or project URL: https://georgia.gov/

The State of Georgia’s Digital Services team (DSGa) supports a network of over 100 websites running on Drupal. Originally built in Drupal 7, DSGa began transitioning to a new Drupal 8 platform in 2019. Until this transition is completed, DSGa is responsible for supporting both Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 sites.

Sites in the network need the capacity to search content from both their own site and other sites, regardless of the version of Drupal being used. While both platforms are hosted on Acquia and use Acquia Search, their Drupal 7 search solution could not incorporate content from the new Drupal 8 sites. This left the DSGa team in an awkward position: either lose functionality while they waited for sites to transition to Drupal 8 or delay the launch of the new platform until all sites were ready.

Fortunately, there was another option. Using the open source Federated Search solution, Palantir collaborated with the DSGa and their development partners to re-launch network-wide search with added functionality in both Drupal 8 and Drupal 7 without any service interruption for site visitors.

Categories: Drupal

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